TMBA 451: Are You Suffering From Analysis Paralysis?

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Dan and Ian struggled (as many entrepreneurs do) getting on their feet and creating the kind of success that would afford them the freedom in their lives that they were seeking. None of that would have been possible if they had succumbed to the subject of today’s podcast.

On today’s episode, we are going to be talking about one of the most daunting afflictions in the entrepreneurial community: Analysis Paralysis.

Analysis Paralysis is the state of over-analyzing rather than doing. Many would-be entrepreneurs will often spend too long reading and learning about business without ever taking action.

Today we will be dissecting what Analysis Paralysis is, how it affects us, and some of the ways that we can battle it for the better.

Transcript

Listen to this week’s show and learn:

  • The problem with information overload. (6:27)
  • Why feeling like you’re doing something doesn’t mean you’ve actually done anything. (10:00)
  • How fear of rejection can shape the way that we work toward our goals. (17:20)
  • The dangers of seeking validation from the wrong people. (22:06)
  • Ways that you can battle Analysis Paralysis and actually start taking action. (28:16)

Mentioned in the episode:

This week’s sponsor:

This week’s episode is brought to you by our newest product, Dynamite Jobs. Dynamite Jobs is a service that helps entrepreneurs and listeners of this show find top, experienced talent to join their teams.  These types of remote positions can be especially challenging to hire for, and we specialize in making that process easy.  Our process means that you’ll only have to post your job once, and we’ll share it with our community of more than 10,000 established remote workers. If you are looking to hire remote team members, head over to DynamiteJobs.co and use code TMBA on the checkout page to get 50% off your first posting.

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Thanks for listening to our show! We’ll be back next Thursday morning 8AM EST. Cheers, Dan & Ian

Published on 07.26.18
  • Allen Walton

    This episode came at a pretty good time for me.

    I’ve been working on several projects, a couple of which have had no progress in months. These could easily have been wrapped up within a few weeks, but instead of making the big moves and doing the things that would have propelled the project along…. I opted instead to just be ‘busy.’

    It’s easy to be busy – you feel like you were productive because you were getting all the details juuuuust right and putting out all the small fires before taking on the big thing.

    Before you know it weeks have gone by and there’s no real discernable difference from where you were before, and when you look at what you spent your time doing it was mostly trying to find ways to avoid what was important and slightly harder.

    Lately I’ve been thinking about Bezo’s quote about how you need to make a decision with about 70% of the available info, or you’re moving too slow. This has been so important to me that it constantly pops up throughout the day to make sure I’m not procrastinating on tiny details that don’t really make that much of a difference.

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